Libya Africa Travel Guide - Libya Tourist Attractions, Libya Transportation, Libya Hotels and Accommodations

Libya Travel Guide

Libya Hotels

Libya Tourist Attractions:
Libya Archeological Sites
Libya Roman Sites
Libya Greek Sites
Libya Tripoli
Libya Sahara Desert

Libya Travel Informations and Libya Travel Guides
Libya Name
Libya Politics
Libya Foreign Relations
Libya Cooperation with Italy
Libya Human Rights

Libya Administrative Divisions
Libya Geography
Libyan Desert
Libya Economy
Libya Demographics

Libyan Education

Libyan Religion
Libya Culture
Libya Contemporary Travel
Libyan Cuisine

Libya History:
Libya Ancient Libya
Libya Phoenicians
Libya Greeks
Libya Romans
Libya Under Islam
Libya Ottoman Turks
Libya Italian Colony

United Kingdon of Libya
Modern Libya


Libya Vacation Trips

Libya Holiday Vacation Trips offers travel tips and information for top travel places and best destinations. We feature links, resources and large selection of budget airlines, chartered planes, sea cruises, ferries, travel agencies, land transports and attractions including beaches, medical tourism, retirement homes, historical and pilgrimage tours.


Libyan Desert

The Libyan Desert, which covers much of Libya, is one of the most arid places on earth. In places, decades may pass without rain, and even in the highlands rainfall happens seldomly, once every 5–10 years. At Uweinat, as of 2006 the last recorded rainfall was in September 1998. There is a large depression, the Qattara Depression, just to the south of the northernmost scarp, with Siwa oasis at its western extremity. The depression continues in a shallower form west, to the oases of Jaghbub and Jalo.

Likewise, the temperature in the Libyan desert can be extreme; in 1922, the town of Al 'Aziziyah, which is located Southwest of Tripoli, recorded an air temperature of 57.8 °C, generally accepted as the highest recorded naturally occurring air temperature reached on Earth.

There are a few scattered uninhabited small oases, usually linked to the major depressions, where water can be found by digging to a few feet in depth. In the west there is a widely dispersed group of oases in unconnected shallow depressions, the Kufra group, consisting of Tazerbo, Rebianae and Kufra. Aside from the scarps, the general flatness is only interrupted by a series of plateaus and massifs near the centre of the Libyan Desert, around the convergence of the Egyptian-Sudanese-Libyan borders.

Slightly further to the south are the massifs of Arkenu, Uweinat and Kissu. These granite mountains are ancient, having formed long before the sandstones surrounding them. Arkenu and Western Uweinat are ring complexes very similar to those in the Aïr Mountains. Eastern Uweinat is a raised sandstone plateau adjacent to the granite part further west. The plain to the north of Uweinat is dotted with eroded volcanic features.

With the discovery of oil in the 1950s also came the discovery of a massive aquifer underneath much of the country. The water in this aquifer pre-dates the last ice ages and the Sahara desert itself. The country is also home to the Arkenu craters, double impact craters found in the desert.


Trip Holidays also showcase a unique blend of travel and leisure photos and stories, updates, events and announcements about roads, shopping malls, hotels, bed and breakfast, restaurants, groceries and more. Not just a travel guide but one-of-a-kind discovery of people and places.

 

Libya Africa Travel Guide - Libya Tourist Attractions, Libya Transportation, Libya Hotels and Accommodations